Henny Acloque  – juxtaposition of painting styles. Flat blocks in bold graphic style overlaying old master-style backgrounds.  Painterly work vs precision and accuracy. There is a tension between the two – particularly in the latter ‘Jerk’ series.  I feel discomfort looking at them – there is a deconstruction of the background styles and an incorporation of division. The overlaying circular and geometric shapes add to my disorientation.  Having said that, close up there is a lightness and humour within the pieces – a playfulness with the brushstrokes.

What can I try in my work?

The tension – try out experiments with combining painting styles.

To overlay two very different concepts/approaches

To contemplate and challenge my use of palette within the confines of the two styles

Contemple deconstruction – what does that mean for me?

Take these painting styles into my practical research for experiential learning.

 

Iain Andrews – abstraction of old masters style – very rhythmic and exciting.  The application of paint is incredibly varied – a combination of styles and layers.  Washes, drips, thin figurative detail – all in the lower layers topped with a thick, gestural, fluid image, referencing subject matter of old masters. Interesting combination of mark making and paint application within the layers. It is complex and varied but not as disorienting as Acloque’s work.  Colour choices – the backgrounds often keep to ‘natural tones’ – blues, greens, earth tones. The foreground is bolder, brighter – more challenging.

What can I try in my work?

Layers.  To allow time to build up different styles within a piece. To give space for the painting to evolve.  To consider purpose of each layer – within that, to consider colour, tone, brush marks, quality of paint application, thick/thin etc. To also consider the meaning of each layer – for there to be a purpose to everything that is painted (or not).

Take these painting styles into my practical research for experiential learning.

 

Roxy Walsh – interesting themes.  Consider whether to bring the ‘female’ element of myself into my work. I am interested more conceptually in Walsh’s work and how that could reflect upon my own practice rather than painting style – I would prefer to work on researching artists that use oil and layering to help my own ideas develop.  Walsh’s work reminds me to contemplate intention, to be rigorous with my questioning of my own choices and to be exact with what I am hoping to convey through my work.

What can I try in my work?

To think further on themes.  To exercise rigour with my own questioning and reflection on the intention of my work and to start doing this with all my work, sketchbook, coursework, research etc (and to keep a log of this).  

 

Charlie Day – like the idea of having a collection of smaller canvases that assembled create a story/energy together.

What can I try in my work?

To think further about presentation and materials.  To consider scale and what I want to paint on as well as how I am painting and in what style. To consider my work in the context of a collection or a show – to think about the whole as well as the minutae.

 

I have also looked at these artists  Cathy Lomax, Annabel Dover Jacqueline Utley – there is a similarity to the painting methods used, one that I could consider using as a layer within my own work.  There is also evidence of  their occasional tondo paintings and themes that continue during their work.

What can I try in my work?

Experiment further with thinned layers of paint (as started with the third module in UPM).  Try to push this outside of my current way of working, to explore how to take this application of paint to a different level.

 

 

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